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Monday, November 19, 2018

Jayne Mansfield Diamonds To Dust : 'A Guide For The Married Man (1967) Jayne Mansfield'

Source:Jayne Mansfield Diamonds To Dust- Son of a beach! 
"Jayne Mansfield Diamonds to Dust: The official trailer for the 1967 film which Jayne Mansfield has a cameo and is actually the last time she appears on the big screen. Her cameo is shown in this trailer. Watch Diamonds to Dust to learn about her life now available on Amazon Prime."

Source:Movies Ala Mark- Baby Jayne Mansfield and Terry Thomas, in A Guide For A Married Man 
From Jayne Mansfield Diamonds To Dust

Source:Flickr via Podie- Baby Jayne Mansfield, in A Guide For A Married Man
I'll be the first to say, actually I would run to make sure I was the first person in line to say that A Guide For The Married Man is not a great movie. It's also not a horrible movie, but perhaps I wouldn't make the same effort to say that. It's a good, funny movie with a great cast: Walter Matthau, Robert Morse, Inger Stevens, Lucile Ball, Phil Silvers, Art Carney, and someone named Jayne Mansfield. ( Perhaps you've heard of her as well )

Except for the bit part or cameo A Guide For The Married Man is right up Jayne's dress, I mean ally for her. Comedy especially romantic comedy was her shtick and it would've been nice if she had a bigger role in this movie. Perhaps playing one of Robert Morse's 10 girlfriends in the movie.

By 1967, Jayne Mansfield was doing most of her work and making most of her money outside of Hollywood. She literally was on the nightclub circuit and doing comedy and music all over America.

Think about that for a second: one of the most popular Hollywood Goddesses from the 1950s reduced to singing and doing comedy at nightclubs by 1965 or so. She was also doing films in Britain and Europe, including in Italy. She was tired of doing comedy in Hollywood and by the early 1960s, wanted a newer role and do other things and expand her acting resume.

Which is sort of like saying that Michael Jordan or Larry Bird is tried of shooting the basketball and scoring points, so what they're going to do instead is just rebound and play defense, pass the ball when they have it instead of leading their team in scoring and leading them to victory.

Comedy for Jayne Mansfield, was like the passing game for the New England Patriots: it was her bread and butter, her go to offense and what made her famous and popular to go along with her goddess body and little girl adorable appearance. And ironic that her last trip back to Hollywood for work was to do another comedy which is what she was doing in the late 50s with movies like Will Success Spoil Rockwell Hunter and The Girl Can't Help It.

If you want a full post or report on A Guide For The Married Man, I suggest you go somewhere else for that, because I'm really just interested in Jayne Mansfield's role in it. She plays the comic relief in a movie that's pretty funny to begin with but is so good at it playing the mistress of a man who is married and her wife catches them together in their bed and he and Jayne play it off like nothing is going on at all and the wife is completely imagining what she's seeing.

And the guy and Jayne just get out of bed, make the bed, get dressed while the wife is in the room and has already seen everything and Jayne leaves the room and house as if nothing had just happened. And they do it so perfectly that the wife starts actually believing that she's imagining everything that she just saw. Great scene with Jayne just making a pretty funny movie even funnier. 

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2 comments:

  1. You can also see this post at FRS FreeState:https://frsfreestate.com/2018/11/19/jayne-mansfield-diamonds-to-dust-a-guide-for-the-married-man-1967-jayne-mansfield/?wref=tp

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  2. You can also see this post on WordPress:https://thedailyreview1975.wordpress.com/2018/11/19/jayne-mansfield-damonds-to-dust-a-guide-for-the-married-man-1967-jayne-mansfield/?wref=tp

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